Search
Generic filters
Exact matches only
Filter by Categories
Ant Information
Cockroach Bait
Cockroach Biology
Cockroach Control
Cockroach identification
Cockroach Information
Cockroach Spray
Cockroach Traps
Garden Pest information
Latest News - E-News
Latest News - General
Latest News - Magazine
MEDIA
All
Pest ID
PPM Magazine
PPM Pest E-News
Scientific Papers
Termite Professional magazine
Termite Professional Magazine - Asean
Termite Professional Magazine - Australia
Videos
Open to the Public
Other Pests
Pest Control Product information
Pest Pulse
Premium Blogs
Spider Information
Termite Information
Wasp Information
Filter by content type
Taxonomy terms

THINK SPIDERS, THINK IPM

Although spiders don’t destroy structures, create allergens or transmit diseases like other pests, homeowners still want them controlled – which is where a pest management professional comes in. In most cases, an integrated pest management (IPM) approach works best to achieve effective indoor and outdoor spider control. Implementing an IPM program involves three key steps, outlined below.

 

Although spiders don’t destroy structures, create allergens or transmit diseases like other pests, homeowners still want them controlled – which is where a pest management professional comes in. In most cases, an integrated pest management (IPM) approach works best to achieve effective indoor and outdoor spider control. Implementing an IPM program involves three key steps, outlined below.

Inspect and exclude

Before treating a customer’s property for spiders, assess the environment to determine how conducive it is to spiders first. Then it will be possible to determine what treatments are appropriate. The pest manager should first inspect for spider webs in corners near ceilings, around windows and doors, behind furniture and other furnishings adjacent to walls. Then use a vacuum to remove webs and spiders from their harborages, and seal and dispose of vacuum bags immediately. Cracks and crevices should be sealed and weather stripping added around doors to prevent spiders from entering structures. Fly screens on doors and windows should be checked and repaired if necessary and any debris cleared away from around the structure.

Consider webs before applying treatments

 Many water-based insecticides do not adhere to spider webs, so spraying webs will rarely result in long-term control. Apply an insecticide to areas where webs have been removed, as spiders are likely to return to these areas to reconstruct their webs. In areas where webs are not present, apply sprays to spider harborage areas around doors and windows, as well as in cracks and crevices.

 

Spider webs
As part of an IPM program, vacuums can be used to remove spiders and Webs

Protect customers with confidence

Demand Insecticide is highly effective at reducing spider populations. Its iCAP technology formulation features small microcaps that release the active ingredient, lambda-cyhalothrin, quickly for immediate control. These microcaps can become lodged in a spider’s tarsal claws or the tufts of hairs between its claws, as well as on other hair follicles on a spider’s legs. Larger microcaps then release the active slowly, giving residual, long-lasting control of spiders and other indoor and outdoor pests.

Although most spiders are more of an annoyance than a danger, customers want these pests eliminated from their properties. By implementing a thorough IPM program, pest managers can enable their customers to live comfortably, without disruption.

Dale HudsonBusiness Manager, Syngenta Professional Pest Management